#FridayFeeling Guest Blog: ‘Tea, Cake and Ambitious Futures’

Guest blog from Tom Fryer, who is the Ambitious Futures Graduate Trainee at SOAS for 2016/17.

Please note that the views expressed in this blog are those of the author and unless specifically stated are not those of SOAS Careers Service. If you consider this content to be in breach of the SOAS values, please alert careers@soas.ac.uk

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Few people can resist an email with a subject line referring to both ‘Tea’ and ‘Cake’, but it wasn’t just my stomach that led me to Ambitious Futures. A quick glance around the website and I was instantly intrigued at the prospect of seeing how universities function from a staff perspective – or perhaps it was simply that a graduate programme in the field of Higher Education seemed a tad more interesting than the Foucault reading assignment on my desk. The idea of working on three placements over 15 months sounded like a great way to pick up a broad range of skills. Plus, getting to grips with three projects over such a short period seemed the perfect test of my oft-repeated cover letter claims to tenacity!

A couple of months later, I found myself navigating an application and phone interview, before attending an assessment day run specifically for the SOAS Ambitious Futures programme. The day at SOAS had been carefully planned to try to simulate activities that Ambitious Futures Graduate Trainees are faced with on a regular basis, from negotiations in meetings, to drafting proposals. I know that ‘assessment day’ doesn’t exactly scream ‘fun’, but there was something about the practical focus (none of those damned logical reasoning tests) and constant interaction with other candidates that made the day pretty enjoyable.

One thing that has continued to stand-out across the application, interviews and orientation for Ambitious Futures, is the emphasis on personal development. As part of the programme everyone works towards a management qualification, ILM Leadership and Management Level 3, which is a great opportunity to reflect a little more deeply on management and workplace dynamics. More importantly, this qualification is taught through Learning Sets, or meetings with six other Ambitious Futures Graduate Trainees from other universities in and around London (if Oxford really counts as ‘in and around London’). This seems to be a great way to learn, as we’re all likely to experience similar challenges in our new work, but also it’s an amazing chance to get to know a bunch of other people who are passionate about contributing to the transformative work of universities.

For more information and to apply, visit the Ambitious Futures website.

Tom Fryer, SOAS Ambitious Futures Graduate Trainee (2016/17)

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Guest Blog: From SOAS Student to SOAS Staff

Guest blog from Harmanjit Sidhu, who is the Ambitious Futures Graduate Trainee at SOAS for 2017/18.

Please note that the views expressed in this blog are those of the author and unless specifically stated are not those of SOAS Careers Service. If you consider this content to be in breach of the SOAS values, please alert careers@soas.ac.uk

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Walking in to SOAS three years ago as undergraduate History student, I never expected to wind up working here. My first few student days at SOAS were a blur of places, faces and names. My first few days as a Staff member at SOAS have been much of the same!

There are definite similarities in the student and staff experience (the building obviously, the queue for the cash machine, the strange extremes in temperature in rooms- freezing cold or boiling hot) but pretty much everything else is completely different.
As a student, you never put much thought into the work going on ‘behind the scenes’ and it has just dawned on me how much machinery is working hard to keep the institute running, whilst seeking ways to maximise the student/staff experience.

For me, it seems a career in Higher Education is a well guarded secret, but once you’re in on it, it’s easy to be impressed by the huge variety of roles and people working here. I have already been exposed to a huge number of issues and problems that had never occurred to me while I was a student here, whilst also being exposed to the various departments handling these issues with innovative strategies and ideas.

A recurring theme from conversations with colleagues over the last few weeks has been ‘too much work, not enough resources’. That’s one of my favourite things about the scheme- I am able to lend a hand to various departments who have brilliant ideas but require an extra pair of hands to bring them to life.

My current posting is in the Library, working on a collaborative project with the Research and Enterprise Office and Staff Learning and Development, looking at ways in which we can improve the induction process for Early Career Researchers and also the ways in which we can improve the support offered to this group. (If you’re reading this as an Early Career Researcher, I would love to hear your thoughts on this).

As a Graduate Trainee on this scheme, I will be posted into three different departments on various projects. Two of these will take place right here at SOAS, and one at the University of Oxford. Whilst I am not looking forward to the idea of that commute, it will be a great chance to develop my knowledge of the sector.

SOAS is a fantastic institution- a place where great minds from all over the world come to
share ideas, where students come to the meet the world, where challenges are faced with
innovation and strategy. Working here for just the last few weeks has just reinforced these opinions, and I am excited about the opportunities the next few months will bring!

For more information about the scheme and to apply head here or email me at hs62@soas.ac.uk.

Harmanjit Sidhu, SOAS Ambitious Futures Graduate Trainee (2017/18)

#FridayFeeling: Join the Team at SOAS

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Happy Friday! Graduated recently and miss being in the midst of the incredible world of SOAS? 

Good news: SOAS Careers is looking for a recent SOAS graduate to act as a graduate intern for the rest of the academic year (till the end of July).

Your role would be to work with the Events and Internships team to support activity in sourcing interesting employers to come onto campus or for our students do do internships. For more information, take a look at the Job Description.

If you are interested, please complete this Google form and send us a copy of your CV to careers@soas.ac.uk by midday on Wednesday 1 November.

Interviews will be held on Tuesday 7 November

Looking forward to hearing from you! 

Alexis Fromageot

#MondayMotivation: Public Sector Week

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Fancy changing the world? This week at SOAS Careers is all about life in the Public Sector! Come along the Careers Zone in SL62 to meet a massive range of employers from the Public Sector, and get some really pertinent advice about taking your next steps in that direction.

 

Not interested in the public sector? Don’t even worry – pop by SL62 and we can talk through anything else to do with your next steps.

Mon 23 Oct, 3 – 4:30pm, Careers Seminar Room (SL62): NHS Assessment Centre Game: http://bit.ly/2gAOZrh

Wed 25 Oct, 11:30 – 12:30pm, Careers Seminar Room (SL62): Premier Pathways Presentation: http://bit.ly/2itZpJZ

Wed 25 Oct, 1 – 4pm, Cloisters, Paul Webley Wing: Public Sector & Teaching Fair: http://bit.ly/2gAfoWc

Thu 26 Oct, 11 – 12pm, Careers Seminar Room (SL62): Shanghai Meiji Presentation: http://bit.ly/2laKG7y

Thu 26 Oct, 1:20 – 2:30pm, Careers Seminar Room (SL62): JET Presentation: http://bit.ly/2gvIJNX

Thu 26 Oct, 2:30 – 3:30pm, Careers Seminar Room (SL62): DAIWA Presentation: http://bit.ly/2zvLRAR

Get involved!

Alexis Fromageot

#MondayMotivation: Business, Finance & Management Week

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The best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago. The second best time is today ~ Japanese proverb

Thinking about taking your next steps in to the world of business and finance? This week at SOAS Careers is all about that! Come along to our great range of events and learn more about how you can shape your future.

Get booked on via MySOAS Student here.

MON 9 OCT

4:30 – 6pm Government Economic Service Presentation, SL62

TUE 10 OCT

1 – 3:30pm Into University: Volunteer Training Session, SL62

WED 11 OCT

1 – 4pm Business, Finance & Management Fair, Cloisters Paul Webley Wing

THU 12 OCT

1 – 2pm Charity Job: Introduction to Charity Sector, SL62

FRI 13 OCT

2 – 3:30pm Open Society Foundations Presentation, SL62

See you there!

Alexis Fromageot

Insight From Your Fellow Student: Working at the Civil Service

As part of our Student Insight blog series, Ranya Alakraa, BSc Development Studies & Economics (graduated 2016) explores her journey from SOAS to the Civil Service Fast Stream. 

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It was the end of the summer after our 2nd year at uni, our third and final year was in sight, until this point I had never thought about my career. My friend called me and informed me grad scheme applications were opening soon. We dialled in a few other friends and in the middle of this four-way conversation the panic set in. What were we doing with our futures?

We all met the very next day in SOAS to figure out our life-plans; we climbed up to the Career’s Office and collected every possible leaflet or brochure on grad schemes, jobs, internships, CV and cover letter writing. By the end of this we were all a little overwhelmed.

We went back to the JCR and started sifting through all these papers, circling and highlighting things which appealed to us. Another friend spotted us and came over; he saw the air of panic surrounding me and asked me a really good question that I myself had never properly thought about. He said where do you see yourself in the future, what is the ideal job you would be doing? So I thought about it for a few minutes, and I said I would be working in policy somewhere in the government, with a focus on economic development. So he told me he had been doing the Summer Diversity Internship for the Civil Service, and that I should consider applying for the Fast Stream…and so I did!

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A few months later, in December of my final year, I had a job offer as an Economist in the Civil Service Fast Stream, and it was all thanks to that fateful day when we all sat in the SOAS JCR! It was a rigorous application process, but doing it so early on in the year meant that I already had a job offer before the New Year and I could focus fully on revision and those final essays in the Spring term.

A few lessons I learnt from my own experience, I probably should have started thinking about jobs and my career earlier on. Doing internships and getting work experience throughout your undergraduate degree is very useful. Doing research on what is out there is even more important, I hadn’t even heard about the Fast Stream until my friend told me about it! And finally, I definitely did not make enough use of the SOAS Career’s Service which probably could have told me about all the opportunities out there and would have helped me with things like job applications.

Nevertheless, I am now working as an Assistant Economist in the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. As part of the Fast Stream I get to rotate after a year to another department, it’s a great opportunity to see how government works from the inside, and how Economics is so crucial to every step of the policy process. I love my job and I can see a really clear future for myself here, but there are plenty of schemes other than the Economics one as part of the Fast Stream, read more about them here!

Ranya Alakraa

Please note that the views expressed in this blog are those of the author and unless specifically stated are not those of SOAS Careers Service. If you consider this content to be in breach of the SOAS values, please alert careers@soas.ac.uk.

International Women’s Day Celebration Event TODAY

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Celebrate International Women’s Day with a whole host of events across SOAS University of London and University of London!

Come and hear from inspiring women talking about their workplace successes TODAY at 1pm City, University of London.

This FREE event is taking place at Northampton Suite, City, University of London, Northampton Square campus, EC1V 0HB

To mark International Women’s Day, inspiring women from different industries will be coming together to discuss what success looks like, both in the workplace and wider life. The panel will be discussing and offering insight on the following:

  • What does success look like for different women?
  • How do leading women in industry achieve work-life balance?
  • What can organisations do to better support women and their progression.
  • Practical tips to tackle key issues such as salary negotiation.

The panel includes women in senior roles from across a range of industries. After a period of panel discussion there will be opportunities to talk to our panellists directly during a Q&A and then following up with some nibbles and networking.

  • Sara Fox, Principal, Fox&Co. Consulting
  • Chloe Challender, Deputy Director of Security, House of Parliament and former co-Chair of Workplace Equality Network, Parliagender
  • Sharon Northey, Securities Associate Manager, Accenture
  • Kate White, CEO, National Centre for Circus Arts
  • Emma Thomas, Head of Employment Law, Essex County Council
  • MaameYaa Kwafo-Akoto, Associate, Allen & Overy 
  • Jackie Wilgar, Senior Vice President, Marketing – International, LiveNation

This event is FREE!

Students and staff can sign up to join, by emailing careersevents@city.ac.uk

Alexis Fromageot

What’s on this Week: Third Sector Week

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Passionate about making a difference? Keen to change the world for the better? Then this week is all for you! We’re taking a look at careers in the third sector – both if it’s your first time stepping in to this rewarding industry or if you’re looking to go back in to this sector after a break.

Not quite sure if this is the path for you, or want to explore more about what working within the third sector will look like? We’re open every day in SL57 and would love to talk your next steps through with you.

Here’s what’s on for Third Sector week:

 

Mon 6 March, 5:30 – 7pm, B111, Brunei Gallery: Working in the Third Sector: http://bit.ly/2mTUNtC

Wed 8 March, 10:30 – 11:30am, Careers Learning Zone (SL62), Paul Webley Wing:  Career options (with IFMR LEAD) for Students with Passion in Addressing the World’s Most Pressing Development Issues: http://bit.ly/2miSkvD

Wed 8 March, 1:30 – 2:30pm, S118, Paul Webley Wing: CVs for the Third Sector: http://bit.ly/2m3ggm2

 

See you there!

Alexis Fromageot

How to get in to Humanitarian Aid and Organisations

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A sobering record was set by the United Nations humanitarian appeal launched in early December. $22.2 billion, the largest sum ever, is needed in 2017 for 93 million people affected by natural disasters and conflict in 33 countries. The Global Humanitarian Overview 2017 provides a more detailed, sobering insight into funding trends and the significant increase in needs over more than a decade.  This is one sector where the growth in demand does not signal a buoyant economy and satisfied shareholders.

If you are considering a career with Humanitarian organisations, how can you research this area and what can you do? Work in this sector is diverse ranging from education to governance and human rights to healthcare. Where do your interests lie?  What you would actually do within humanitarian organisations is equally varied as are the routes into the sector.  There are many different skills and knowledge sets needed so thinking about where your strengths and work interests and practical considerations such as location and the type of working lifestyle that you want can also be a useful starting point.

The size and structure of organisations involved in some way with the humanitarian sector vary considerably from Governmental organisations such as DFID (the UK’s Department for International Development), International organisations which include the UN and its agencies and NGOs (Non Governmental Organisations) and charities.  If your interest is in research in a broader context, then academic institutions and ‘think tanks’ such as the Chatham House (known more formally as the Royal Institute International Affairs) work on international and development topics.

Whilst working as a project manager or specialist practitioner in the field may be the first type of work which springs to mind if you are just starting to explore options; there are other possibilities. Humanitarian organisations, like many others, have infrastructure needs such as finance and logistics. Generating income through fundraising  (across a spectrum from individuals to corporate and grant making organisations), educating and informing audiences through communications and media and working in policy and research are all roles that can  in varied ways to enabling charities, non governmental organisations and others deliver.

You can find lots of information on the different roles and employers within the International Development section of Occupational sectors on MySOAS Student. Also in this section are links to a large number of job vacancy sites such as BOND (British Overseas NGOs for Development) and Eldis. Looking at current job vacancies even if these are targeted at more experienced staff can give you a great insight into the nature of opportunities. LinkedIn can be an additional useful resource in this respect, not only because you can begin to network with those working in the sector but because you can follow organisations (could be useful for vacancy posts), look at the backgrounds of people working for them and also join interest groups to further your knowledge and contacts.

Being able to articulate an informed interest in the sector will be crucial to securing opportunities. Volunteering and internships can enable you to build an insight into this multifaceted area. Think carefully about the contribution which you want to make and where your talents, knowledge and skills might best be used. Your overriding driver may be because you want to make a difference – passion and enthusiasm is important but refining your thoughts about the part you can play is important.

How do you want change your world?

Claire Rees, Careers Consultant

What’s on this Week: Humanitarian Aid & Organisations Week

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This week at SOAS Careers we delve in to everything to do with working in the humanitarian aid sector! Come and hear more about the realities of working in this rewarding sector, with great advice from people currently working with a range of employers.

Don’t worry if this doesn’t appeal – you can still pop by for the usual support!

Mon 5 Dec 5.30 – 7pm, B111, Brunei Gallery: Working for a Humanitarian Aid Organisation: http://bit.ly/2gXExWN

Wed 7 Dec, 1:30 – 3pm, S118, Paul Webley Wing: Careers in Not For Profits: http://bit.ly/2gGzSKL

See you there!